An argument in favor of oil drilling in alaskas arctic national wildlife refuge

The National Congress of American Indians representing tribesthe Native American Rights Fund as well as some Canadian tribes also oppose drilling in the area.

Arctic Refuge drilling controversy

The first national wildlife refuge was established in the United States in Loomis,and the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge was established in Access roads run alongside the pipelines so that workers can maintain the pipes.

Last week, the Senate voted to open up the refuge to oil and gas drilling for the first time ever. Additional oil production resulting from the opening of ANWR would be only a small portion of total world oil production, and would likely be offset in part by somewhat lower production outside the United States.

Fish and Wildlife Service manages the remaining acres to maintain their wilderness characteristic. At present, even those alternative fuels that are available lack widespread utility for the simple fact that the production, delivery, and distribution infrastructures are not yet in place to allow consumers the option of choosing an alternative fuel source.

Should the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge be Opened to Oil Drilling?

For now, the future of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge looks to be as uncertain as ever. Effects on Wildlife Oil spills can be devastating for wildlife.

In the coastal plain of the refuge, Congress mandated a study to determine whether the area should be wilderness or opened for oil and gas development. The drilling and land development would create hundreds of thousands of jobs.

The measure tagged along in a revision of a tax bill, which would need approval from the House of Representatives and President Trump. In a Nutshell Yes No The proceeds from drilling could dramatically lower the price of oil, leading to another economic boom.

The pipeline company works with the researchers to get them access to some of the restricted roads. Spring keeps coming earlier to the Arctic, but the deer have kept to their age-old schedules, meaning they miss the prime foraging season.

Plus, a democratic Congress or president could put up additional roadblocks in the intervening years.

Green Chip Stocks

Boelman suspects waterfowl and caribou are most likely to be affected. Environmental Law, 28 4 They say the administration has failed to allow enough time to conduct the scientific and social research necessary to comply with a dozen major federal land laws and other rules.

This remote corner of Alaska is truly connected to all ends of the Earth. Effects on Wildlife Oil spills can be devastating for wildlife.

Most wildlife refuges, however, are mixed use, meaning that in addition to the wildlife protection activities that occur on the land, the land may have specifically defined recreational and even economic purposes Loomis, Polar bears could possibly go extinct in our lifetimes.

We asked her how she thinks oil operations would impact the region. The proceeds from drilling could dramatically lower the price of oil, leading to another economic boom. It would lessen our dependence on foreign oil, especially in the Middle East.

Drilling could easily be done without disrupting the refuge or damaging the environment. The argument for drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is economic.

Proponents say it will create jobs, generate $ billion over the next decade, and make the country more energy. Men in Utqiaġvik, Alaska, prepare to head to work in the oil and gas industry in (Al Grillo / AP) The history of drilling in ANWR arises from the history of the state of Alaska.

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On June 18,President George W. Bush pressed Congress to reverse the ban on offshore drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in addition to approving the. Protecting the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Print this page For 37 years, the Refuge Association has fought to keep this refuge closed to oil and gas development.

Alaska’s economy depends on the oil industry for one-third of its jobs, but other oil prospects are drying up, according to Alaska’s (pro-drilling) Resource Development Council.

Arctic Refuge drilling controversy

The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge covers million acres in northeastern Alaska.

An argument in favor of oil drilling in alaskas arctic national wildlife refuge
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Oil Drilling in Alaska: The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR)